Dissecting my first brain – Anatomy and Physiology update

As you can see, we've cut away the cerebellum, and we found this grey flakey-looking mass that we assumed must have been a tumor.

As you can see, we've cut away the cerebellum, and we found this grey flakey-looking mass that we assumed must have been a tumor.

There’s something kind of surreal about holding a brain. When we were cutting, we were jokingly asking each other “where do you think the ‘good boy’-center is,” and wondering what dog breed the brain had belonged to. Then it really hit us that even though it looked like an inconsequential lump of nerves, connective tissue and veins, that was it. That was the organ in charge of interpreting every sensory signal, every action potential, your memories, what makes you "you".

As you can probably tell, I’m liking this subject a lot. This is for me one of the quintessential medicine subjects. When I imagined what it would be like being a vet student, doing all these dissections, learning all the Latin nomenclature, looking at all the different charts and atlases was exactly what I had in mind, and so far, it’s living up to my expectations.

Since Easter is coming up, I’m trying to cram in as much studying as I can these last couple of days before we go on break. I’ve also been lining up a couple of interesting blog posts, so if the stars align you’ll hopefully be seeing a few interviews with interesting people in different veterinary professions, and I’ll definitely be posting a ‘how-to guide’, on how to apply for veterinary internships and jobs when you don’t have any prior experience. So stay tuned, and I hope I didn’t gross you out too much with this brain update.